Workforce demography

An example of a demographic collected in human resources is gender, which may include all employees within a particular job, e. Other demographics include age, length of service and educational level. Demographic data is helpful with respect to HR planning and, more specifically, succession planning.

Workforce demography

Side Event Prince Mahidol Award Conference 30 JanuaryBangkok Thailand Session Report Summary of Session The session brought together stakeholders and experts in health workforce, labour markets, and demography, to present a framework for health workforce demography, including examples related to ageing, gender, and international migration.

The session highlighted the fundamental importance of understanding the population of health workers, including relevant demographic tools, in order to achieve UHC and SDGs.

The session engaged over thirty participants, including representatives from government, international organizations, academic institutions, and civil society, in discussion on the value of understanding the demographic characteristics of health workers, as a complement to a health labour market understanding.

The session concluded with agreement to build on the momentum of the session through further elaboration of the health workforce demography framework at the upcoming Fourth Global Forum for Human Resources for Health in November Ashish Bajracharya spoke to the importance of understanding demographic processes, and value of demographic tools, to better project and match the demand for health services and the supply of health workers.

As illustration, he contrasted ageing transition in Japan to a similar, though accelerated, transition occurring in Nepal. Christopher pointed to how longstanding health workforce challenges can be explained and addressed through a health labour market approach.

He concluded by pointing to examples of specific health labour market analysis, as contained in the book Health Labour Market Analyses in Low- and Middle- Income Countries: Andrea Nove, building on the first two presentations, made the point that much as demography matters at the population level, so too does it matter at a health workforce level.

Andrea then presented a health workforce demography framework that builds on the standard demographic approach. An example from Ghana illustrated the importance of understanding demographics of the health workforce.

Following responses to questions for clarification from the audience, specific elements of the health workforce demography were presented. Asha George spoke to the importance of understanding and responding to gendered nature of the health workforce.

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Asha pointed to the need to ensure the rights and working conditions of all health workers, recognizing that predominantly female. She spoke to the existence of gender-based wage gaps, as well as gaps in leadership and career advancement. Asha concluded by highlighting the need for appropriate measurement, valuing, and rewarding of women in the health workforce.

Ibadat Dhillon followed by speaking on the topic of international migration of health workers. Ibadat presented data reflecting the increasing magnitude of health worker migration, as well as increasingly complex patterns of movement and complexity of the international migration of health workers.

The dichotomy of source and destination countries was questioned.

Workforce demography

An illustration from Kerala was provided that captured the demographics of emigrant physicians from Kerala. The presentation concluded with examples of innovative practice in collaboration. He pointed to the increasing feminization of the medical workforce in the younger age groupings; in significant contrast to earlier patterns.

He concluded by pointing to the increasing importance of gender-sensitive employment policies with respect to Thailand. The session concluded by an open and wide ranging discussion amongst the audience and presenters on the framework proposed, as well as its component parts.

Workforce demography

The session concluded with a call to continue the analytic work underpinning the framework. Jim Campbell closed by reiterating the importance of understanding the health workforce as its own population and invited participants to engage in the approach. He pointed to the upcoming Fourth Global Forum on Human Resource for Health in Ireland as an opportunity to reconvene and continue to build a shared understanding in the area.At its core, demography is the act of counting people.

But it’s also important to study the forces that are driving population change, and measure how these changes have an impact on people’s lives.

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Generations: Demographic Trends in Population and Workforce | Catalyst

Demographic Change and the Future Workforce Important demographic trends will take place in the workforce over the next years. The emerging patterns are the result of ups and downs in birthrates (low in the late s and early s, high in the late s through the early s, and modest growth in the late s through the early.

Workforce Demographics, Metrics and Succession Planning Merriam-Webster defines “demographics” as the statistical characteristics of human populations such as age or income.

An example of a demographic collected in human resources is gender, which may include all employees within a particular job, e.g. Important demographic trends will take place in the workforce over the next years.

The emerging patterns are the result of ups and downs in birthrates (low in the late s and early s, high in the late s through the early s, and modest growth in the late s through the early s).

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Home Doing Business Workforce and Demographics Overview The Columbus Region’s workforce is highly educated, diverse and young, with one of the nation’s highest concentrations of millennials.

Heterogeneity and diversity have replaced the homogeneous workforce that pervaded before. The generations working together today that are relevant for the purpose of our study are: Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y, or the so-called Millennials.

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